T O M O R R O W
Mar 5, 2014 / 2 notes

T O M O R R O W

Jan 23, 2014

Tameka Norris as Meka Jean, “Too Good For You,” the first single from Norris’s upcoming feature-length film for Prospect 3 New Orleans Biennial

randomchromogenic:

Torino, Italy - June 16, 1999
http://randomchromogenic.tumblr.com
Jan 23, 2014 / 3 notes
Nina Yuen’s videos will screen through this Saturday, January 18, as part of Cinematheque19. Make sure to stop by each week for a program of videos by different artists!
Jan 14, 2014

Nina Yuen’s videos will screen through this Saturday, January 18, as part of Cinematheque19. Make sure to stop by each week for a program of videos by different artists!

Jan 10, 2014 / 179 notes

globalartnews:

MOUNIR FATMI    MOROCCO

Jan 6, 2014 / 155 notes

dynamicafrica:

BEST POSTS OF 2013 #48: Casablanca circles by Mounir Fatmi.

Casablanca Circles is a series of drawings done on photographs taken from an excerpt from the movie Casablanca of the final kiss Bogart and Bergman. The tangent circles of Descartes and Soddy are drawn on the pictures of the two main characters as they move closer to kiss.

This infinity of circles raises the viewer’s desire and at the same time, project our hope to see both actors united.

Although the movie refers to the Moroccan city Casablanca, occupied by the french government of Vichyduring the WWII, all the sets have been built in Hollywood. Those two lives, the real and the fictional, of the city disorient even the Moroccans and push the tourists to look for the Rick’s Café and the other locations of the movie during their stay.
The story of the movie is about an impossible love surrounded in clichés of spying and exoticism.

During the war, a couple escape the Nazis and land in Morocco in order to get the papers to join the United States. Their only contact and their only hope is the former lover of the woman.

Beyond fiction and maths, mounir fatmi wants to make us believe that something is still possible.

October: Highlighting African Art & African Artists

lostinurbanism:

Kemang Wa Lehulere
Jan 6, 2014 / 52 notes

lostinurbanism:

Kemang Wa Lehulere

(via bebeautifulla)

pictureframewomen:

Ulrich Lamsfuss, Escape Escapism
Jan 5, 2014 / 1 note

pictureframewomen:

Ulrich Lamsfuss, Escape Escapism

englishsummerrainx:

light headed on Flickr.
Jan 5, 2014 / 1 note
anassembly:

Tameka Norris
Untitled (F*ing art History), 2009
Jan 4, 2014 / 11 notes

anassembly:

Tameka Norris

Untitled (F*ing art History), 2009

An emigrant from Taiwan to the United States as a teenager, Lee often revisits memories associated with his Chinese heritage. In Singapore, at the Peranakan Museum (6/21–9/22), dedicated to the culture of descendants of 15th-century Chinese immigrants to Indonesia, Lee’s piece Luminous Depths (2013) was inspired by the museum itself, whose central atrium reminded him of his grandparents’ home. Visitors were invited to purchase a ceramic pot, walk up to the top floor and cast it down to the ground level below (to the accompaniment of Schubert’s “Night and Dreams”), a momentous act that prompted reflection about the memories and associations that we attach to objects.
(via ArtAsiaPacific: Lee Mingwei)
Jan 4, 2014

An emigrant from Taiwan to the United States as a teenager, Lee often revisits memories associated with his Chinese heritage. In Singapore, at the Peranakan Museum (6/21–9/22), dedicated to the culture of descendants of 15th-century Chinese immigrants to Indonesia, Lee’s piece Luminous Depths (2013) was inspired by the museum itself, whose central atrium reminded him of his grandparents’ home. Visitors were invited to purchase a ceramic pot, walk up to the top floor and cast it down to the ground level below (to the accompaniment of Schubert’s “Night and Dreams”), a momentous act that prompted reflection about the memories and associations that we attach to objects.

(via ArtAsiaPacific: Lee Mingwei)

“Lee Kit” at Lombard Freid, New York (April 17 – May 31): After representing Hong Kong at the 2013 Venice Biennale (and generating his fair share of buzz at the second annual Art Basel in Hong Kong), Lee Kit is surely a name to watch in 2014. Details of the exhibition (his first solo in NYC since 2011) haven’t been released yet, but we’re not afraid to make an educated guess—his last show at Lombard Freid and hisYou (you) installation in Venice both centered around quotidian rituals and materials, visually articulating these themes in meticulous installations resembling domestic spaces.
(via Artsy Editorial | Our Most Anticipated Gallery Exhibitions in 2014 | Artsy)
Jan 3, 2014 / 1 note

Lee Kit” at Lombard Freid, New York (April 17 – May 31): After representing Hong Kong at the 2013 Venice Biennale (and generating his fair share of buzz at the second annual Art Basel in Hong Kong), Lee Kit is surely a name to watch in 2014. Details of the exhibition (his first solo in NYC since 2011) haven’t been released yet, but we’re not afraid to make an educated guess—his last show at Lombard Freid and hisYou (you) installation in Venice both centered around quotidian rituals and materials, visually articulating these themes in meticulous installations resembling domestic spaces.

(via Artsy Editorial | Our Most Anticipated Gallery Exhibitions in 2014 | Artsy)

Three Duets, Seven Variations” Performances by Tameka Norris and Senga Nengudi at the Studio Museum in Harlem (November 14, 7–9pm)
Few performances stay with me for weeks afterwards, but this one-two punch of short performances that were simultaneously part of the Performa performance festival and the Studio Museum in Harlem’s half of the Radical Presence show were powerful.
Tameka Norris’s untitled performance involved the artist live painting on the walls of a gallery using her tongue, which she slit with a knife in front of the audience. The endurance of the act of painting (it took roughly 20 minutes), coupled with the fascination of congealed blood that formed on the walls gave the work a silent visceral quality that vibrated in my bones.
After Norris, Senga Nengudi presented a work from her important RSVP series, featuring sand and pantyhose sculptures that were activated by artist Maren Hassinger (one of Nengudi’s original collaborators), Regina Rocke, and Marya Wethers. The relationship between the art and the bodies of the performers was obvious, and coupled with Norris, it was an intense meditation on the limits of the human body and its abstraction into art.
(via 10 Best NYC Art Shows in 2013)
Jan 3, 2014

Three Duets, Seven Variations” Performances by Tameka Norris and Senga Nengudi at the Studio Museum in Harlem (November 14, 7–9pm)

Few performances stay with me for weeks afterwards, but this one-two punch of short performances that were simultaneously part of the Performa performance festival and the Studio Museum in Harlem’s half of the Radical Presence show were powerful.

Tameka Norris’s untitled performance involved the artist live painting on the walls of a gallery using her tongue, which she slit with a knife in front of the audience. The endurance of the act of painting (it took roughly 20 minutes), coupled with the fascination of congealed blood that formed on the walls gave the work a silent visceral quality that vibrated in my bones.

After Norris, Senga Nengudi presented a work from her important RSVP series, featuring sand and pantyhose sculptures that were activated by artist Maren Hassinger (one of Nengudi’s original collaborators), Regina Rocke, and Marya Wethers. The relationship between the art and the bodies of the performers was obvious, and coupled with Norris, it was an intense meditation on the limits of the human body and its abstraction into art.

(via 10 Best NYC Art Shows in 2013)

Dec 6, 2013 / 10 notes

Pillows by Lee Kit.

Born in Hong Kong in 1978, Lee Kit currently lives and works in Hong Kong and Taipei. Shifting across a diverse range of media, Lee’s practice is deeply rooted in his personal surroundings and experience. Trained as a painter at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, he soon began to move away from representational tendencies and the limitations of stretched canvas, reducing the act of painting to a network of repetitive lines and squares. His recent installations combine different objects, images and mediums to form sparse yet intimate settings that suggest traces of immaterialised relationships.

Source: venicebiennale.hk

Lee Kit represented the Hong Kong at this year’s Venice Biennale.

Photographs by the artist.

nycartscene:

thru Jan 4:“Escape Escapism” Ulrich Lamsfuss Lombard Freid Projects, 518 W19th St., NYC“During art school, watching people constructing artificial problems to solve them afterwards, I realized that my basic problem is that I don’t really have a real problem. Wherever I go, somebody has been there before. Everything is said—just not by everybody.”-Ulrich Lamsfuss, 2013
Dec 3, 2013 / 983 notes

nycartscene:

thru Jan 4:

Escape Escapism
 Ulrich Lamsfuss

Lombard Freid Projects, 518 W19th St., NYC

“During art school, watching people constructing artificial problems to solve them afterwards, I realized that my basic problem is that I don’t really have a real problem. Wherever I go, somebody has been there before. Everything is said—just not by everybody.”
-Ulrich Lamsfuss, 2013